Videos and pictures show how dangerous and deadly many “road diets” are

The “road diet” on Foothill Boulevard in Sunland-Tujunga, CA severely exacerbated gridlock as people fled the 2017 La Tuna fire.

One of the central arguments officials and advocates proffer in favor of “road diets” and other traffic calming measures is that they improve safety. Unfortunately, in too many places nationwide the reality is the opposite of the rhetoric. Over the past several months people around the country have documented the impacts of these projects in their communities, particularly when it comes to emergency response times. Moreover, traffic calming measures often increase rather than decrease accidents, injuries, and fatalities. For example, after three years of road diets and other projects under Vision Zero in Los Angeles, pedestrian fatalities have almost doubled.

The trend in L.A. isn’t good.

As we’ve noted previously, in November 2018 “road diets” in Paradise, CA contributed to gridlock during evacuations from the Camp Fire, the largest in California history. Demonstrating just how far the anti-car ideology has gone in the Golden State, the Butte County Association of Governments (BCAG) brazenly ignored a 2008 Butte County Grand Jury report recommending that roads in Paradise be widened and otherwise improved for evacuations during wildfires. The pictures speak for themselves (notations ours):


Tragically, the steps BCAG took to reduce road capacity contributed to mass gridlock as people fled the Camp Fire in November, 2018. That conflagration was the biggest in California history, destroying some 15,000 structures and leaving at least 88 people dead. Numerous interviews with survivors in the immediate aftermath (we joined the first evacuees to be allowed back into the fire zone on November 22) confirm that the narrowed roads made it harder for people to flee. As one resident put it, “Even before the fire we wondered what the hell they were thinking.”

The main picture above was taken during the fire, and it shows cars struggling to pull right as fire engines race toward the flames. There can be no more definitive evidence that traffic calming, when done without due regard for public safety, not only impedes evacuations but also the ability of first responders to reach the scene. It’s a lose-lose.

Frighteningly, counties throughout California are reducing lane capacity by installing traffic calming devices and “road diets” in fire evacuation zones. For example, the Shasta Living Streets initiative calls for lane reductions on roads that served as major evacuation routes during the 2017 Carr Fire. Sonoma County is narrowing roads used during the 2018 Tubbs Fire. Oakland has installed numerous road diets on streets that are actually officially designated emergency routes, many of which served as critical lifelines during the deadly 1991 firestorms. Captain Henry Holt of the Oakland Fire Department says, “I found out about a road diet in front of my station when I arrived for a shift one morning.”

On a more quotidian but no less distressing note, residents in Mar Vista, CA and Queens, NY have captured dozens of pictures and images of fire engines, ambulances, and police cars slowed by road diets on Venice Boulevard and Skillman Avenue, respectively. Both projects have been the focus of intense community opposition. Again, the videos speak for themselves.

Off the record we have spoken to dozens of first responders nationwide. Almost without exception they express frustration and disgust with these politically motivated projects. Example after example, study after study after study confirms that traffic calming devices increase emergency response times with deadly results.

When will officials and advocates wake up and realize they’re threatening lives every day?

A fire engine and ambulance stuck on the Venice Boulevard road diet in Mar Vista, CA
A police car slowed by the Venice Boulevard road diet in Mar Vista, CA (note the bicyclist on the sidewalk)
A fire engine stuck on the Skillman Avenue road diet in Queens, NY
A fire engine crashes into parked cars on the Skillman Avenue road diet in Queens, NY
A fire engine stuck on the Skillman Avenue road diet in Queens, NY
A fire engine stuck on the Skillman Avenue road diet in Queens, NY
A police car slowed by the Venice Boulevard road diet in Mar Vista, CA
An ambulance stuck on the Skillman Avenue road diet in Queens, NY
A fire engine slowed by the Venice Boulevard road diet in Mar Vista, CA
A fire truck and ambulance slowed by the Venice Boulevard road diet in Mar Vista, CA
An ambulance stuck on the Skillman Avenue road diet in Queens, NY
A fire engine and ladder stuck on the Venice Boulevard road diet in Mar Vista, CA
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3 thoughts on “Videos and pictures show how dangerous and deadly many “road diets” are

  1. The car haters don’t care about the negative consequences, so long as they can heavily restrict the legitimate and emergency car traffic.
    James C. Walker, National Motorists Association

    Liked by 1 person

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